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REVI CHEETAH PRICE REDUCED $150
REVI CHEETAH PRICE REDUCED $150
The 3 Classes of Electric Bikes

The 3 Classes of Electric Bikes

Do you want to better understand what exactly a class of ebike means? Then read this article to figure out everything you need to know. Knowing the class of your electric bike will tell you where and how you can ride it to make sure you are never breaking the law.

Why is your electric bike class important to know?

Electric bikes are gaining popularity and becoming an alternative mode of transportation for lots of people. They can be used as a means of exercise, or a vehicle to get you to the places you need. Throughout the years, manufacturers are continuously upgrading the components of their electric bikes and now it is getting the the point where some are very powerful. Some of these bikes are getting close to a motorcycle which should obviously come with more regulation and safety protocols (Insurance, driver license, helmet etc).

They decided there was a need to classify electric bikes to be able integrate them into the transport system safely. Using a 3-class system aligns manufacturers, state regulators, and transportation planners with the ultimate goal of having electric bikes regulated safely.

Electric Bike Classes Explained

Here is a basic explanation of the 3 electric bike classes with their level of motor assistance and maximum speed.

3 Classes of ebikes

Class 1: The Class 1 electric bikes are called low-speed pedal-assisted electric bicycles. The electric motor works only when the rider is peddling and stops assisting when the bike reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour. This bike has a maximum motor power limited to 750W. These bikes are usually allowed on city streets, bike lanes, bike paths, roads shared with regular or traditional bikes, or anywhere you would ride conventional bikes. There is no need for a driver's license and no age limit.

Class 2: The Class 2 electric bikes are called low-speed throttle-assisted electric bicycles. These electric bicycles have pedal-assist mode and a throttle-powered mode with a top motor-assisted speed of 20 miles per hour. This bike has a maximum motor power limited to 750W. Typically, Class 2 electric bikes are allowed in the same places as Class 1 electric bikes. There is no need for a driver's license and no age limit.

Class 3: The Class 3 electric bikes are called speed pedal-assisted electric bicycles. The electric motor works only when the rider is pedalling and stops assisting when the bike reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour. The bike has a maximum motor power limited to 750W and comes equipped with a speedometer. Class 3 electric bikes are allowed on roads and in-road bike lanes but are not permitted on bike paths outside of the road or on multi-use trails shared with pedestrians. These bikes are perfect for commuters and errand runners primarily using roads as they are faster than class 1 and class 2 electric bikes. These bikes are also ideal for daredevils as they help riders go faster. There is no need for a driver’s license, the rider must be 17 or older, and a helmet is required.

CLASS 1

CLASS 2

CLASS 3

Pedal assist

Throttle

Maximum Speed

20 mph

20 mph

28 mph+

State Electric Bike Policies

Electric bike laws and regulations on where you ride your bike, what gear you need vary from state to state. Check your local electric bike laws before making the final choice of your electric bike class, as they may be slightly different from the popular 3-classification system. You may inquire with your local transportation authorities for the most up-to-date information. You can also find your state's electric bike rules in the People for Bike's list. Knowing and observing your electric bike laws and regulations helps protect those around you, avoids fines, and ensures you are safe and having fun on your bike rides.

If you are shopping for an electric bike and you want more information about the classes, don't hesitate to reach out! We are readily available to help you find your dream electric bike!

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